This time its serious-I am fucked beyond relief

#51
rhetorical: do you honestly think you're going to get some semblance of equity for your work at the failing place if it does indeed recover?

about this word travels thing, forget it. you have two paths. one is staying on with a failure and either fixing it, or nothing. the other is going on to work with your successful mentor, which sounds like it actually does lead to other opportunities that don't include donating your time to a lost cause, coming out at the other end with nothing to show for it as a likelihood.
 
#52
Doing this 180° in a 24H time period feels like a dick move and again, word travels.
Word does travel. Everyone will know you were smart enough to ditch a shitty situation before the whole place went belly up.

Seriously..."word" doesn't matter in this situation...at all. It isn't like you are ghosting an old position and taking a new job without notice or cause. They aren't paying you. You own them no loyalty.

Let's say instead of them not paying you, you didn't show up to work for 3 months because whatever some times got tough with personal stuff. Do you think they would think twice or feel bad about firing your ass?
 
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#59
I guarantee they'd can your ass if it was you in trouble but they had a better opportunity to grow.

Just go to the new job. Word traveling means shit. Hold the new job for at least two years and nothing else matters.
 
#61
Don’t go down with the ship. You’ve done your best to stick around while they've tried to figure things out but 3 months with no pay is way too long. There’s a good chance that you’ll never get that back pay and even if they level out at some point, who is to say they wont go down the same road in the future. It’s not worth the trouble, and it’s likely the reason the other chef left.

Jump ship and go for the better opportunity,, your loyalty for sticking around WILL NOT benefit you in the future.
 
#66
Not getting paid really seems like a huge dealbreaker to me, regardless of anything else. It's like, the whole reason you're there.

Jump ship!
 
#71
OP I'm super curious, how did it go the first time they told you you weren't getting paid for the last two weeks? What did they say? What were you thinking at the time?
 
#73
I feel like you're being manipulated by someone with this "word travels" threat you keep referring to. Just put in your two weeks to train your replacement and take the better job.
 
#75
If you haven't been paid for 3 months and other key employees have left and you've been given no clear and feasible plan for recovery, you're working for a zombie enterprise.

Leave now, or one day suddenly show up to a place with locked doors and no active utilities. And no backpay.
 
#77
Not every place deserves to stay in business. They mismanaged the place while you were away and ran it into the ground. That's not on you. If they can't stay afloat without you, they don't deserve to remain open. You can't place an entire restaurant on one person's back.
 
#79
Im honestly impressed that they managed to have anyone still there. I would have left for walmart or something. Anything is better than that job.
 
#81
and as a professional I have an obligation to run the ship ti the last breath.
Unless you're the owner, no you don't.

But word travels. I give up on my current job, and I can easily shut the store down with that kinda move cause I am vital to the kitchen running. I really don't need that weight on my back. And yet its my mentor. On a lot of levels I owe him a lot, as he went through a lot at the start of my career to mold me into a great cook. For him to call me and speak as an equal, to want me to come to his side and work the kitchen together, I would haul ass. How the hell do I handle this?
The biggest lie they tell you at retail is that you're vital to the company surviving. It's bullshit. You're not. They'll find someone else. And if they can't pay you, they aren't really a business.

Leave and never look back.
 
#86
as a professional I have an obligation to run the ship ti the last breath.
Not unless you have equity, you don't. Do you know why it's called being a "professional"? Cause you do this for a living. If they're not paying you, it's not a profession, it's a volunteer gig.
 
#87
[...] and as a professional I have an obligation to run the ship ti the last breath.
No, you don't.

With all due respect, but you work in a kitchen, not running a hospital where human lives depend on you.
In the working world you're a dime a dozen, if a better opportunity arises, you better take it fast or somebody else will do it. Don't overthink it and do what's best for you.
 
#88
You’re a fool if you stay at your current job. You’re a fool to give a shit about them going under. Unless you’re an owner that’s not your concern. They’d give zero shits about leaving you without the ability to pay your bills.

Pay is behind three months? You don’t have a job. You’re doing volunteer work.

Folks under 30: I can NOT stress enough the importance of having zero fucks when it comes to leaving a current job for a better one. As long as you try your best to give notice and remain amicable even while your current employer huffs and puffs. That’s the main method to increase your income. The days of putting in 40 years and retiring are over. These jobs lets folks go with not a single thought. Do likewise.
 
#90
I dunno, I get attached to these things easily. Indunno if stolckholm syndrome is the right phrase, but I just feel like maybe trying to get things back in order is not the worst option.

No idea really.

Eh. Wasn't trying to be dramatic, I just feel like I'm in a corner. This decision to take the reigns came up only yesterday as the last chef hightailed it on short notice, and today I get another call from another job. Doing this 180° in a 24H time period feels like a dick move and again, word travels.

Edit: I also forgot to mention that as a proper restaurant, I have no worries about Night shifts, the work schedule is way more lax, and getting in with that crowd gets you in for life with the cities inner chef circle. I guess its not help as much as affirmation that I am doing the right thing, even with a less then weeks notice.
How old are you?
 
#92
Your thread title and content of your OP....don't really make sense to me.

It's admirable that you want to stay but don't think staying and screwing your self or your future over has anything to do with being "professional". You are in a terrible spot right now yes...I will give you that, but this opportunity just landed and you need to take it. If your current employer doesn't understand that then well...to bad. You are not responsible for that last manager that ran that debt up. You need to look out for you and you only.

Think about your career OP, hell your lively hood, before worrying about what others might think of you if you left a dying dead end job.
 
#94
OP, ask your mentor what they would recommend you do? If he's that good and honest, he'll likely recommend you switch over.
Even before I left for the army he knew my issues and wished he could bring me back on board. Its been clear he wants me in the kitchen for well over a year.
OP I'm super curious, how did it go the first time they told you you weren't getting paid for the last two weeks? What did they say? What were you thinking at the time?
It went down badly. They were already having issues but there was a small bubble where they kept up for a couple of months. My mind was thinking why am I still here, and I am basically a zombie employee just going through the motions. But even then I still try my best to be as professional I can and do my job the only way I know how to. I guess a lot is going through my mind, and its all just too confusing.
If word travels, then everyone already knows you work at a shithole.
Pretty much, yeah. I got at least 5 wtf looks from previous coworkers coworkers in the field who came back from their summer jobs only a couple of days ago and they already heard whats going down.
Im honestly impressed that they managed to have anyone still there. I would have left for walmart or something. Anything is better than that job.
We are like 6 key emoloyees who have stuck with the store for over 2 years and about 20 newbies who are changing every month. Its a mess.

You know what's a bigger dick move? Not paying your employees. When "word travels," that's the word that will travel.
Already is.
 
#97
Some background:
Started working at a casual/fast food diner back in 2016. Stayed there for 13 months, pay came on time every 2 weeks and despite issues with the management's attitude I was completely okay with the place. Went for mandatory conscription for 9 months, and started working afterwards cause I needed a job. Place was in total shambles. One boss left after leaving a huge amount of debt, pay is behind 3 months, food quality has dropped and the job is a total dead end. And that's where I am right now.
In a hole with no pay. The kitchen is without a chef and we are working 12 hour shifts till we find new people cause its a 24H place. Boss told us he is handing me and my coworker the responsibility of running the kitchen. And today was my first day as the other half of Kitchen Management. I still have no idea why I'm staying, beyond the fact that I like the store concept, have no ill will towards the boss as we are keeping afloat a good thing that may end up paying us better in the long run, and as a professional I have an obligation to run the ship ti the last breath. In comes the phone call from my mentor this morning.
Old place I had my apprenticeship at called me up today to offer me a job. And I want it badly. Great establishment, on time pay and proper benefits. Much higher quality food, I can improve in a proper cooking environment and I am much more friensly with the staff as I still go by monthly to have a coffee and say hi. But word travels. I give up on my current job, and I can easily shut the store down with that kinda move cause I am vital to the kitchen running. I really don't need that weight on my back. And yet its my mentor. On a lot of levels I owe him a lot, as he went through a lot at the start of my career to mold me into a great cook. For him to call me and speak as an equal, to want me to come to his side and work the kitchen together, I would haul ass. How the hell do I handle this?
I understand the feeling of responsibility toward the failing location, you never want to let someone down like that when you feel like you're the last line of defense. But sometimes you just have to realize that in some situations you have to take care of yourself and choose not to damage your own journey on behalf of someone else.

In the end, the failings of the poor location are not yours and you're likely just delaying the inevitable. A great opportunity has presented itself to you and you'd be foolish not to take it. Whatever results afterward is their responsibility, not yours.

At my job I am always happy for coworkers that find better work, even if I'm not happy about the situation it creates for us. Because in the end, you know everybody has to make the best choice for their situation. And that's what you need to do here.

as a professional I have an obligation to run the ship ti the last breath.
The captain goes down with the ship and encourages the crew to get into the lifeboats.
You are not the captain. You are crew. A rare lifeboat is floating by.
 
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#99
OP. The shittiest you can feel is about screwing further your coworkers but remember this. You are in it for yourself. You need to be paid. This is a high stress environment. If you feel really bad and are able to give a 2 weeks notice, do so. At least that way you are giving the minimum amount of 'acceptable' notice. But if you are miserable, then just leavem
 
You work for money, they don't pay you, you don't work. That's kind of the whole point.

Get out of there and find something better.
 
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